Auditor's work papers? acts discreditable

CPA Exam Forum The Forum AUD Review Auditor's work papers? acts discreditable

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  jamin_G 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #160282

    jamin_G
    Participant

    In manners consistent with rules…. I know it is not allowable to retain client prepared documentation after they demand it be returned. But is there a rule requiring an auditor to return work papers he / she has prepared during an engagement?

    Also, my friends are asking me about questions on the exam as they are preparing to take it as I am the first to have a go. I have a tendency, ability, to remember certain questions, especially the ones I am unsure, of word for word. How specifically vague should i be while discussing the exam and assisting in their preparation? In college we would tell each other questions to look out for as one person left the exam and another walked into it. I just hope not to break any rules.

    #282017

    kb24
    Participant

    The auditor’s work papers belong to the auditor. With the exception of peer reviews and legal subpoenas, he/she can’t show the work papers to someone outside the firm without the client’s permission but does not have to give them to the client

    As far as your friends, I’d be very careful as far as what I said. My general rule is not to say anything about the question content or even subject matter beyond what I’ve read in study material or on the AICPA website. Maybe I’m too circumspect, but I’d rather err on the side of caution.

    #282018

    CPAMan
    Participant

    Client prepared documentation belongs to the client. So, these are not yours to keep.

    Auditor’s workpapers belong to the auditor. So, these are yours and you can keep these.

    #282019

    CalCPASoon
    Participant

    If you prepared audit workpapers while employed by a CPA firm, then the workpapers actually belong to the firm, not the auditor that prepared them.

    You cannot discuss anything that you saw on the exam. You shouldnt discuss any specific questions, or even give information about the content that was tested. Or do you not remember the disclosure statement you agreed to when you sat for the exam?!

    #282020

    jamin_G
    Participant

    Thanks for all the help. I have also refereed my friends and others who have questions regarding the exam here (another71).

    I feel bad saying “Sorry I can’t tell you” but I suppose there will be time in business when the same will apply. Suppose I should get used to it.

    Next step, actually getting that job in business.

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